JeepRumors
Trending

Refreshed 2021 Jeep® Compass Gets Closer To Production:

Here Is What We Know...

As the world is getting ready to return to work, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) is getting ready to launch a ton of new and revamped products this fall. While most of the company’s programs have been pushed back a few months to a year, one vehicle that will launch close to its original scheduled date is the refreshed 2021 Jeep® Compass (MP)

The Jeep® brand has had success globally with its current-generation Compass. Currently, the Compass is built at five manufacturing plants around the world (Mexico, Italy, India, China, and Brazil), more than any other Jeep vehicle in the current lineup. The refreshed Compass looks to continue that success and has been pushed back 1 to 3 months from its original launch date, depending on the manufacturing region.

2021 Jeep® Compass Prototype From China. (chejiahao.autohome.com.cn).

The 2021 Jeep Compass will receive an updated front and rear fascias, which we are hearing will take some styling details from the upcoming 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee (WL) models. One of the biggest complaints about the current Compass is being addressed for the North American market has been the lackluster 2.4-liter four-cylinder powertrain, which is standard on all North American models.

According to our sources, Jeep will replace the old 2.4-liter with the Renegade’s 1.3-liter direct-injection turbocharged engine with engine stop-start (ESS) technology making 180 horsepower and 210 lb.-ft. of torque. So horsepower should be around the same numbers as the old 2.4-liter, but the new powertrain will add 35 lb.-ft of torque more to the vehicle. This should buyers more acceleration power when entering the freeway and more confidence when passing other vehicles.

2020 Jeep® Compass 4xe First Edition. (Jeep).

The recently introduced electrified 2020 Jeep Compass 4xe models, that Jeep has opened orders for in Europe, are equipped with the 1.3-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that drives the front wheels. The rear wheels are driven by a separate electric motor. The Compass 4xe carries an 11.4-kilowatt-hour battery that can be recharged while driving or through an external outlet like the Wallbox, a dedicated home charging station. Drivers can recharge at 3 kilowatts for 3.5 hours, or upgrade to 7.4 kilowatts for 100 minutes. On a full charge, the Compass 4xe can drive 50 km (31 miles) in pure electric mode. Compass 4xe is rated with a top speed 130 km/h (81 mph) in electric mode and 200 km/h (124 miles) in hybrid mode, for the European-spec models.

There will also be minor interior changes going into 2021, while the overall design theme remains the same. Tweaks to the climate controls and upgrades to the interior materials will be the biggest changes for the new model year. We don’t expect the 8.4-inch Uconnect infotainment touchscreen to be updated with the new 5th generation Uconnect software.

2021 Jeep® Compass Prototype From China. (chejiahao.autohome.com.cn).

A larger three-row variant of the Compass will be making its debut as well. However, don’t expect this yet to be named model to appear in the North American lineup. The three-row model will instead be available in the EMEA, APAC, and LATAM regions. According to our sources, the three-row model will be built in India and Brazil along with the Compass. Production of that model has been pushed up by two months in India and pushed back three months for Brazil due to the COVID-19 (or Coronavirus) pandemic.

We will be keeping our eyes on the refreshed Compass as it gets ready to launch. Stay tuned to MoparInsiders for more details on the 2021 Jeep Compass as they arrive. 

Picture Source: chejiahao.autohome.com.cn

 

Tags

Robert S. Miller

Robert S. Miller is a diehard Mopar enthusiast who lives and breathes all that is Mopar. The Michigander is not only a Co-Editor for MoparInsiders.com, 5thGenRams.com, and HDRams.com but an automotive photographer. He is an avid fan of offshore powerboat racing, which he travels the country to take part in.

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close