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Jeep EV Technology

Lyrad

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Hi, I read your recent article about the new EV Jeep pickup and SUV variant…they are awesome looking vehicles and certainly get my attention as we already enjoy having a Wrangler Sahara , but are needing a new second vehicle in the not too distant future. These thought s in mind, while I applaud Stellantis for their efforts regarding embracing green EV technology, I still believe there is a very large audience who are not fully sold on going full EV. My reason in taking this stance is that the infrastructure in charging stations is still spotty in many areas. Aside from coverage issues, there are growing concerns with non functioning or damaged units along side the concern regarding long lines of EV drivers waiting inline to charge their vehicles. Other concerns with the effect of mining heavy metals and other materials to create batteries is a growing and pressing concern. The problem intensifies respective to where and what will be done with a growing refuse of non functioning batteries.

Given what I’ve said, does it not bare some consideration to offer future buyers an option in terms of the type of power source they choose? I wou,d be interested and potentially a buyer of your future vehicles, but not if they are fully EV in terms of offerings….I prefer a hybrid as this largely eliminates the issue of finding a charging station late at night on some rural highway. Gas is still the more prevalent energy source and will be for years to come…further, not everyone will be able to afford an EV at todays prices….they tend to be more a luxury item than for the larger masses currently. I suppose as adoption increases, prices will reduce, however, it will take years, hence the suggestion for gas, hybri, PHEV and full EV options.
 

JasonB

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Hi, I read your recent article about the new EV Jeep pickup and SUV variant…they are awesome looking vehicles and certainly get my attention as we already enjoy having a Wrangler Sahara , but are needing a new second vehicle in the not too distant future. These thought s in mind, while I applaud Stellantis for their efforts regarding embracing green EV technology, I still believe there is a very large audience who are not fully sold on going full EV. My reason in taking this stance is that the infrastructure in charging stations is still spotty in many areas. Aside from coverage issues, there are growing concerns with non functioning or damaged units along side the concern regarding long lines of EV drivers waiting inline to charge their vehicles. Other concerns with the effect of mining heavy metals and other materials to create batteries is a growing and pressing concern. The problem intensifies respective to where and what will be done with a growing refuse of non functioning batteries.

Given what I’ve said, does it not bare some consideration to offer future buyers an option in terms of the type of power source they choose? I wou,d be interested and potentially a buyer of your future vehicles, but not if they are fully EV in terms of offerings….I prefer a hybrid as this largely eliminates the issue of finding a charging station late at night on some rural highway. Gas is still the more prevalent energy source and will be for years to come…further, not everyone will be able to afford an EV at todays prices….they tend to be more a luxury item than for the larger masses currently. I suppose as adoption increases, prices will reduce, however, it will take years, hence the suggestion for gas, hybri, PHEV and full EV options.
Welcome to the platform.
Take your stance.
People will reply.
Enjoy.
 

redriderbob

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Hi, I read your recent article about the new EV Jeep pickup and SUV variant…they are awesome looking vehicles and certainly get my attention as we already enjoy having a Wrangler Sahara , but are needing a new second vehicle in the not too distant future. These thought s in mind, while I applaud Stellantis for their efforts regarding embracing green EV technology, I still believe there is a very large audience who are not fully sold on going full EV. My reason in taking this stance is that the infrastructure in charging stations is still spotty in many areas. Aside from coverage issues, there are growing concerns with non functioning or damaged units along side the concern regarding long lines of EV drivers waiting inline to charge their vehicles. Other concerns with the effect of mining heavy metals and other materials to create batteries is a growing and pressing concern. The problem intensifies respective to where and what will be done with a growing refuse of non functioning batteries.

Given what I’ve said, does it not bare some consideration to offer future buyers an option in terms of the type of power source they choose? I wou,d be interested and potentially a buyer of your future vehicles, but not if they are fully EV in terms of offerings….I prefer a hybrid as this largely eliminates the issue of finding a charging station late at night on some rural highway. Gas is still the more prevalent energy source and will be for years to come…further, not everyone will be able to afford an EV at todays prices….they tend to be more a luxury item than for the larger masses currently. I suppose as adoption increases, prices will reduce, however, it will take years, hence the suggestion for gas, hybri, PHEV and full EV options.

Welcome. PHEV is the way to go to be honest. I have no idea why we are being forced to BEV when we don't have an infrastructure in place.
 

bill burke

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You have chosen a Jeep that straddles the line between being a slave to a charging monster or having your cake and eating it too.
You, I am confident, have browsed my position on all electric brands and your choice seems to bolster my position. Lyrad makes some reaffirming counter points also, good ones indeed, and takes my position that buyers need choice and to go all electric brand wide is a fools road to failure.
Can the Recon live side by side with a Hurricane powered Grand Cherokee, of course, in fact both in and of themself they both actually enhances the brand, yet starts down a possible path to new forms of power, while allowing Jeep an off ramp to what I strongly believe will be the future for decades, choice in power.
In the end, technology, resource availability and generating/grid capacity will determine as much as will buyer acceptance of free market choice. Mandates and EPA unrealistic standards will succumb to reality and the masses.
 

patfromigh

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Haven't bought gas in 2 weeks for my wife 4xE Grand Cherokee
How long does it take to charge the batteries? Our fleet's Pacifica PHEVs go from 0 to 100% in 2 hours and ten minutes. We are using level 2, 40 amp charging stations. The Kia Niro, Hyundai Kona ,and Nissan Leaf pure battery EVs each take around eight hours. A Ford Escape PHEV took 3 hours, but only had 20 miles of range when it was done. It should have been closer to 40 miles, but it has serious battery degradation from never being properly charged before our charging stations were installed. Meanwhile our new BMW X5 plugin hybrids take 6 hours to fully charge and only have about 30 miles of range when full.
 

patfromigh

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Regular ICE powertrains without any electrification are a dying breed. Toyota's hybrids are clearly advancing along a different evolutionary path than that of other brands. Stellantis has chosen to offer 48V mild hybrids, a front drive based high voltage plugin hybrid, the ZF 8-speed hybrid transmission, and finally pure battery electrics. As I have pointed out in another forum, the Toyota hybrid system as found in the Prius, the Chrysler plugin hybrid system in the Paciifica, and the Ford hybrid system used on some Maverick, Escape and Fusion models all have the same starting point. That point of genesis is the TRW hybrid powertrain development which began in the 1950s following the Suez Crisis. Chrysler's development trajectory is different enough from Toyota and Ford to not have any patent conflicts, while Ford and Toyota have had litigation against each other along the way. Toyota is now introducing their 5th generation hybrid while Ford's progress is stalled by the chip shortage. The Chrysler eFlite has been around since 2016 and is definitely getting old. It needs a mode selection like the Compass 4Xe uses. I don't know if Stellantis will allow eFlite to be updated, because it isn't a French invention and can be cheaply replaced by a Chinese built, dual-clutch piece of junk.

The rear drive based Jeep 4Xe plugin hybrids use the ZF high voltage hybrid system. There will also be a next generation mild hybrid version of the ZF eight speed. It will be much better than the BSG setup presently used by Ram and Jeep. The Compass and Renegade 4xe PHEV models use an e-axle which is an electric motor on the rear axle. Jeep uses the same vendor that Mitsubishi uses for the Outlander PHEV and the unit has a good track record.

Following the protests over the ICE ban in the EU, if the Recon doesn't offer some sort of range extender, it should be renamed the Reject. Pure battery electrics are a niche vehicle and some of the market niches are tiny.
 

TripleT

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How long does it take to charge the batteries? Our fleet's Pacifica PHEVs go from 0 to 100% in 2 hours and ten minutes. We are using level 2, 40 amp charging stations. The Kia Niro, Hyundai Kona ,and Nissan Leaf pure battery EVs each take around eight hours. A Ford Escape PHEV took 3 hours, but only had 20 miles of range when it was done. It should have been closer to 40 miles, but it has serious battery degradation from never being properly charged before our charging stations were installed. Meanwhile our new BMW X5 plugin hybrids take 6 hours to fully charge and only have about 30 miles of range when full.
2 hours. I have a 50amp charger but I think the Jeep only uses 40 amps. The ZF solution is a good one where the Torque converter is replaced with motors.

Did anyone see what just happened at the EPA... while I expect the opposition party to push back and there to be court challenges, but the EPA effectively made ICE engines impossible to be compliant by 2027 even ahead of the Carb schedule.
 

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